Storytelling in the Far North since 2002

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Counting down to the 1,000-mile Yukon Quest

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    Twitter and Selfies Changed How I See Myself

    Twitter and Selfies Changed How I See Myself

    By Julia Madeline Taylor on February 1, 2016

    I will turn 40 this year, and I have to admit, it has been years since I liked taking, or seeing, pictures of myself. Like, David Carr, who wrote about the new way that photography and selfies are impacting the world, in his January 2015 article, Selfies on a...

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    Feasibility study will determine fate of Wood Center

    Feasibility study will determine fate of Wood Center

    By Spencer Tordoff on February 1, 2016

    Plans for new tech and bookstore outlets in the Wood Center are on hold pending further study, according to a top campus administrator. “We have competing interests in space in Wood Center,” said Ali Knabe, UAF’s executive officer for university and student advancement.  “To be fiscally responsible, we need...

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    New Honor’s Book Club Open to All

    New Honor’s Book Club Open to All

    By Julia Madeline Taylor on January 28, 2016

    The club will not require any writing, but suggested writing prompts will serve as a starting point for discussions. Book Club organizer Sarah Hartman hopes that this will help students reflect on how the books they are reading impact their views of the world, and themselves.

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    Campus parking citations dominated by metered lots

    Campus parking citations dominated by metered lots

    By Spencer Tordoff on January 28, 2016

    Trying to avoid a parking ticket at UAF? Your best bet is steering clear of lower campus, according to ticketing patterns over a recent four-year period. The data, drawn from a spreadsheet tracking the location parking tickets were issued by the UAF Police Department, spans from the 2010-2011 academic...

HARTMAN JUSTICE PROJECT

John HartmanA teen found dying in the shadows. Two confessions, four arrests. Three trials. Sentences of 33- to 79- years. Eighteen years later, an Alaska judge weighs new claimed evidence the Fairbanks Four are innocent.

 

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